Afro-American Historical And Genealogical Society

(Nashville Chapter)
3415 West End Avenue, 1104E, Nashville, TN 37203
615-972-1328 [Edit]
EIN: 861149630
Contact: Pamela E Foster




The Nashville Chapter of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc. (http://www.myspace.com/aahgsnashville) is a not-for-profit organization with a mission per its bylaws (2) to support the mission of the national organization of AAHGS by providing resources for historical and genealogical studies, creating a supportive network among researchers, and showcasing and celebrating the findings.

Our creed is: Remember the Future. Our motto is: Cuddle up with a good read: Lose and find yourself in your family and community histories! We support historical and genealogical research conducted by individuals and own the intellectual property rights for all of the projects we produce. Via the AAHGS Nashville website, we also market and distribute books and other historical projects, some of which are created by AAHGS board and general members.

After generating a track record since 2005, the organization in 2012 launched its first worldwide fundraising effort. Members and friends of the organization make donor solicitations to individuals, groups, foundations, and government entities in person, by mail, by email, by phone, via the AAHGS Nashville website, and via charity web sites such as Charityblossom.org. While no donations of real or other property have been sought, AAHGS Nashville graciously will accept any gift. AAHGS Nashville does not raise funds for other organizations.

AAHGS Nashville donations are unrestricted and support all of the organization’s activities, including website maintenance to reflect current work and facilitate membership, history and genealogy book purchases for sale on its website, the HBCU Newspaper History Project, and the Nonagenarian Slave Grandchildren Remember Project. All research expenditures are reviewed by the the board, which receives a written report on each project to ensure that resources are used to further AAHGS Nashville’s tax-exempt purposes.

The HBCU Newspaper History Project is first-of-its-kind research that documents student newspapers at America’s historically black colleges and universities one era, one editor at a time. It begins with 1886-1888 at Fisk University’s Fisk Herald, partially under the editorship of W.E.B. Du Bois, and 1950-1952 at Tennessee State University’s The Meter, under the founding editorship of Samuel F. Yette. The initial researcher and project organizer is award-winning Nashville writer and newspaper expert Pamela E. Foster, secretary and a co-founder of AAHGS Nashville.

While the primary objective of the initial research is to ascertain connections between the teaching environment administrators and advisers create in the newspaper extracurricular activity and the learning editors acquire and apply in their careers, the overall project also aims to avail historical HBCU newspapers and documentation of editor and staff member experiences to the public for industry advancement, social context, general knowledge, genealogy research, and other purposes.

The Nonagenarian Slave Grandchildren Remember Project focuses on videotaping oral histories of the dying last generation who personally knew slaves and giving DVDs of the oral histories, transcript of oral history, DNA test results, text explaining DNA results, and 1940 Census record to the subjects for gifting to their family members. This is in the spirit of the centenarian slaves who were to be named and interviewed for the 1860 U.S. Census and in honor of the 2011-2015 sesquicentennial of the Civil War, including the January 1, 1863, implementation of the Emancipation Proclamation.

The AAHGS Nashville secretary has been asked by the national president of AAHGS to chair the AAHGS National Special Projects Committee to nationalize both the HBCU Newspaper History Project and the Nonagenarian Slave Grandchildren Remember Project among other projects initiated by AAHGS chapters.

Among AAHGS Nashville’s recent and usual activities are in 2011 Fletcher Moon presented ”Watch Night: African American Adaptation of a Christian Service During and Since the Civil War Period,” Dr. Lynn Lewis presented “Juneteenth: From Texas to Tennessee and Beyond--Slavery's Last Stand,” and Pamela E. Foster presented “The Confederate Flag: Hanging in the Home of an African-American Historical Writer” all at the Kentucky-Tennessee American Studies Association Conference “Images, Sounds, and Meanings of the Civil War.”

In 2010 Dr. Richard Browning, Jr. presented “Dead Livestock: A Retrospective on the Nashville Flood’s Impact on the Goats at Tennessee State University” and Jo Ann Williams McClellan presented research that led to the book “Gone But Not Forgotten: African American Cemeteries and 1908-1930 Death Records of Maury County, Tennessee,” both at the Civil Rights Conference Room in the Nashville Room of the Nashville Public Library.

In 2009 Principal organizers of a project to renovate historic Jefferson Street in Nashville presented "Gateway to Heritage" at Stillwaters Cafe, 1207 Jefferson Street. Presenters were Ginger Hausser Pepper, who received an $800,000 grant through TSU's Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement for the project; The Edge Group, former Tennessee Titans football player Eddie George's design firm; and Kwame Leo Lillard of the Jefferson Street United Merchant Partnership, Inc. (JUMP).

In 2008 Dr. Thomas Edward Brannon presented research that led to his father’s book “Times to Be Remembered” at the Civil Rights Conference Room at the Nashville Room of the Nashville Public Library. In 2007 Carrie Gentry presented research that led to the book “A Life Worth Living: A Biography of Howard Gentry, Sr.” at the Civil Rights Conference Room in the Nashville Room of the Nashville Public Library.

In 2006 Gloria McKissack and Pamela E. Foster presented “Trace History, Forge Connections to Past” at the Black History Month celebration at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Nashville and Julia Otey Lee presented “Family Historians Uncover Slave Past” at the Civil Rights Conference Room in the Nashville Room of the Nashville Public Library.

Among the AAHGS Nashville members who have published their research are Carrie Gentry in the book “A Life Worth Living: A Biography of Howard Gentry, Sr.,” John F. Baker, Jr. in “The Washingtons of Wessyngton Plantation,” and Pamela E. Foster in the books “My Country,” “My Country, Too,” “Nashville’s Holy Trinity Episcopal Church,” and “With the Faith of Benjamin.”

The local chapter is part of The Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc.’s Washington, D.C,.-based network of local chapters, which is the premier organization dedicated to documenting and disseminating African-American genealogy and history. Because of this close connection, AAHGS Nashville membership includes national membership and benefits.

AAHGS national members receive the annual scholarly Journal of the Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society and the bi-monthly newsletter AAHGS News (Jan/Feb; Mar/Apr; May/June; July/Aug; Sept/Oct & Nov/Dec). Other benefits include reduced conference fees and networking with other people researching history and genealogy.

AAHGS Nashville is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization registered to raise funds in Tennessee and does not charge for its events. It was chartered November 12, 2005, by founding members Dr. Carol Creswell-Betsch, Margarette Robinson Foster Chesser, Dolores Porter Foster, Pamela E. Foster, Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Jewel Ann Dillihunt McCallister, Michelangelo McCallister, Sr., Gloria Haugabook McKissack, Lena Brown Prince, Jessie Carney Smith, and H. Henryne D. White.

Because of the founding members’ diligent work, AAHGS Chapters Committee Co-chair Lucius Bowser said in his November 16, 2005, letter acknowledging establishment of the AAHGS Nashville chapter that, "I also want to congratulate you and your chapter as being the quickest approved Chapter in history. Great work."

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Summary

The Nashville Chapter of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc. is a not-for-profit organization with a mission per its bylaws (2) to support the mission of the national organization of AAHGS by providing resources for historical and genealogical studies, creating a network of researchers, and showcasing and celebrating the findings.

Our creed is: Remember the Future. Our motto is: Cuddle up with a good read: Lose and find yourself in your family and community histories! We support historical and genealogical research conducted by individuals and organizations and own the intellectual property rights for all of the projects we produce, which are marketed and distributed via the AAHGS Nashville website. We also market and distribute books and other historical projects via the AAHGS Nashville website, some of which are created by AAHGS board and general members.

After generating a track record since 2005 and with a goal of $125,000, the organization in 2012 is launching its first worldwide fundraising effort. The funds specifically are to relaunch its website to reflect current work and facilitate membership, buy history and genealogy books for sale on its website, and support the organization’s major new projects, the HBCU Newspaper History Project and the Nonagenarian Slave Grandchildren Remember Project. (AAHGS Nashville does not raise funds for other organizations.)

The HBCU Newspaper History Project is first-of-its-kind research that documents student newspapers at America’s historically black colleges and universities one era, one editor at a time. It begins with 1886-1888 at Fisk University’s Fisk Herald, partially under the editorship of W.E.B. Du Bois, and 1950-1952 at Tennessee State University’s The Meter, under the editorship of Samuel F. Yette. The initial researcher and project organizer is award-winning Nashville writer and newspaper expert Pamela E. Foster, secretary and a co-founder of AAHGS Nashville.

While the primary objective of the initial research is to ascertain connections between the teaching environment administrators and advisers create in the newspaper extracurricular activity and the learning editors acquire and apply in their careers, the overall project also aims to avail historical HBCU newspapers and documentation of editor and staff member experiences to the public for industry advancement, social context, general knowledge, genealogy research, and other purposes.

The Nonagenarian Slave Grandchildren Remember Project focuses on videotaping oral histories of the dying last generation who personally knew slaves and giving DVDs of the oral histories, transcript of oral history, DNA test results, text explaining DNA results, and 1940 Census record to the subjects for gifting to their family members. This is in the spirit of the centenarian slaves who were to be named and interviewed for the 1860 U.S. Census and in honor of the 2011-2015 sesquicentennial of the Civil War, including the January 1, 1863, implementation of the Emancipation Proclamation.

The AAHGS Nashville secretary has been appointed by the national president of AAHGS to chair the AAHGS National Special Projects Committee to nationalize both the HBCU Newspaper History Project and the Nonagenarian Slave Grandchildren Remember Project among others.

Among AAHGS Nashville’s recent and usual activities are in 2011 Fletcher Moon presented ”Watch Night: African American Adaptation of a Christian Service During and Since the Civil War Period,” Dr. Lynn Lewis presented “Juneteenth: From Texas to Tennessee and Beyond--Slavery's Last Stand,” and Pamela E. Foster presented “The Confederate Flag: Hanging in the Home of an African-American Historical Writer” all at the Kentucky-Tennessee American Studies Association Conference “Images, Sounds, and Meanings of the Civil War.”

In 2010 Dr. Richard Browning, Jr. presented “Dead Livestock: A Retrospective on the Nashville Flood’s Impact on the Goats at Tennessee State University” and Jo Ann Williams McClellan presented research that led to the book “Gone But Not Forgotten: African American Cemeteries and 1908-1930 Death Records of Maury County, Tennessee,” both at the Civil Rights Conference Room in the Nashville Room of the Nashville Public Library.

In 2009 Principals of a project to renovate historic Jefferson Street in Nashville presented "Gateway to Heritage" at Stillwaters Cafe, 1207 Jefferson Street. Presenters were Ginger Hausser Pepper, who received an $800,000 grant through TSU's Center for Service Learning and Civic Engagement for the project; The Edge Group, former Tennessee Titans football player Eddie George's design firm; and Kwame Leo Lillard of the Jefferson Street United Merchant Partnership, Inc. (JUMP).

In 2008 Dr. Thomas Edward Brannon presented research that led to his father’s book “Times to Be Remembered” at the Civil Rights Conference Room at the Nashville Room of the Nashville Public Library. In 2007 Carrie Gentry presented research that led to the book “A Life Worth Living: A Biography of Howard Gentry, Sr.” at the Civil Rights Conference Room in the Nashville Room of the Nashville Public Library.

In 2006 Gloria McKissack and Pamela E. Foster presented “Trace History, Forge Connections to Past” at the Black History Month celebration at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Nashville and Julia Otey Lee presented “Family Historians Uncover Slave Past” at the Civil Rights Conference Room in the Nashville Room of the Nashville Public Library.

Among the AAHGS Nashville members who have published their research are Carrie Gentry in the book “A Life Worth Living: A Biography of Howard Gentry, Sr.,” John F. Baker, Jr. in “The Washingtons of Wessyngton Plantation,” and Pamela E. Foster in the books “My Country,” “My Country, Too,” “Nashville’s Holy Trinity Episcopal Church,” and “With the Faith of Benjamin.”

The local chapter is part of The Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc.’s Washington, D.C,.-based network of local chapters, which is the premier organization dedicated to documenting and disseminating African-American genealogy and history. Because of this close connection, AAHGS Nashville membership includes national membership and benefits.

AAHGS national members receive the annual scholarly Journal of the Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society and the bi-monthly newsletter AAHGS News (Jan/Feb; Mar/Apr; May/June; July/Aug; Sept/Oct & Nov/Dec). Other benefits include reduced conference fees and access to other persons searching their history and genealogy.

AAHGS Nashville is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization becoming registered to raise funds in Tennessee and does not charge for its events. It was chartered November 12, 2005, by founding members Dr. Carol Creswell-Betsch, Margarette Robinson Foster Chesser, Dolores Porter Foster, Pamela E. Foster, Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Jewel Ann Dillihunt McCallister, Michelangelo McCallister, Sr., Gloria Haugabook McKissack, Lena Brown Prince, Jessie Carney Smith, and H. Henryne D. White.

In his November 16, 2005, letter acknowledging establishment of the AAHGS Nashville chapter, AAHGS Chapters Committee Co-chair Lucius Bowser said, "I also want to congratulate you and your chapter as being the quickest approved Chapter in history. Great work."

Financial information in-depth

Form 990 documents

We do not have Form 990 documents for this nonprofit yet. Check back periodically.

Assets and Revenues reported Dec. 1, 2012

Asset Amount:
Income Amount:
Form 990 Revenue Amount:

Organization Information

NTEE Code:
Ruling Date:
April 1, 1982
Group Exemption Number:
3277
Subsection Code:
N/A
Affiliation Code:
Intermediate
Classification Code:
N/A
Deductibility Code:
Contributions are deductible.
Foundation Code:
Organization that normally receives no more than one third of its support from gross investment income and unrelated business income and at the same time more than one third of its), support from contributions, fees, and gross receipts related to exempt purposes. 509(a)(2)
Activity Code:
N/A
Organization Code:
Corporation
Exempt Organization Status Code:
Unconditional Exemption
Advanced Ruling Expiration Date:
N/A
Filing Regulation Code:
990 - Required to file Form 990-N - Income less than $25,000 per year
Filing Regulation Code:
No 990-PF return
Asset Code:
0
Income Code:
0
Account Period:
December